FACTORS RELATED TO NURSING STAFF JOB SATISFACTION IN A MEDICAL AND SURGERY HOSPITAL

Juan Máximo Molina Linde, Francisco Avalos Martínez, Laura Juliana Valderrama Orbegozo, Ana Fernanda Uribe Rodríguez

Abstract


Objective: to analyze the degree of job satisfaction of staff nurses working in a medical and surgical hospital, and to establish the socio-demographics and professional factors related to their job satisfaction. Methodology: cross-sectional and performed on seventy five persons of the nursing staff of the medical and surgery hospital (total: 510) of Ciudad Sanitaria Virgen de las Nieves of Granada (Spain), by means of a self-administered and anonymous survey. The questionnaire has two parts: the first one is Font-Roja test (it measures the job satisfaction) and the second one are the socio-demographic and labor variables. Results: the average age of the staff who answered the survey was 42.9 years; 72% women, married 64.9%; permanent staff; 58.7% hospitalization staff and a 67.6% have rotating turns. The Font-Roja degree of global satisfaction was medium (69.92 ± 10.48), range from 24 to 120. The best valued dimension is “interpersonal relation with the workmate” (3.82 ± 0.86) and the worse one is “professional promotion” (2.28 ± 0.75). The work place is a predicting element of the job satisfaction (ß=-0,297, p=0,018). Analysis and discussion: a work place guaranteeing more job satisfaction for the nursing staff would improve the quality of care received by the patients of this type of personnel.



Keywords


satisfacción en el trabajo; personal de Enfermería; atención hospitalaria; gestión de calidad

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