Nursing Students’ Experiences of Clinical Education: A Qualitative Study

Leila Bazrafkan, Majid Najafi Kalyani

Abstract


Objective To comprehend the experiences of nursing students in clinical education.

Methods A qualitative study using conventional content analysis was conducted. Data were collected using focus group interview with 16 nursing students from two public nursing schools of Shiraz and Fasa, Iran. The participants were selected by purposeful sampling. Data analysis accomplished according to conventional content analysis.

Results From this study five categories were emerged: Theory and practice disruption (The inability to use the lessons learned in practice, Routine-oriented work, The difference between theoretical knowledge and clinical training), Shaky communications (Inappropriate behavior, Inadequate support of nurses, instructors and other caregivers), Inadequate planning (Wasting time for students in clinical training, Inadequate preparation of instructors and students), Perceived tension (Stress, Anxiety and Fear), Personal and professional development (Learning more steadily, Paying attention to the spiritual dimension of care, Increasing interest in the profession, More knowledge, greater Self Confidence).

Conclusion. The results of this study showed that nursing students have desirable and undesirable experiences in clinical education in the process of training, which must be addressed with proper planning for reduce the students' problems in the clinical education of future nurses.

 

Descriptors: clinical education; focus groups; qualitative research; students of nursing.

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