García-Vivar, La Rosa-Salas, and Domingo-Oslé: Are Nursing Students Trained to Meet the Needs of Cancer Survivors and Their Families? New Challenges, New Opportunities

Current cancer treatments, along with more effective prevention measures, are producing increased cancer survival globally;1 becoming - in many cases - a chronic disease.2 Care of patients and families, living with a chronic disease, like cancer, constitutes one of the principal challenges for most health systems because they represent a heavy burden in terms of morbidity and mortality and carry a high percentage of the public expenditure in health.3 Above all, the impact of cancer entails suffering and represents an important limitation in the quality of life, productivity, and functional state of the sick individuals and those living with them, that is, their family. More so, with evidence of the progressive increase of the number of older people with cancer, who are more prone to having comorbidities and other problems associated with their age, like dementia, depression, cerebrovascular accident, and diabetes.4 Hence, the need for care and support toward these families is clear and imperative.

This new health context is influencing upon the setting where health care takes place. Thus, there is a need for Nursing and nurses to develop new ways of working that include innovative roles and profiles, greater openness of care approaches,5 as well as the opportunity to demonstrate greater leadership in health services and, thereby, contribute to responding to current health challenges; among them, the challenge of chronicity and family-centered care.6 In parallel manner, the new professional context is influencing on the formation of future health professionals, also in the setting of cancer care, as indicated by different national and European scientific societies on oncology.7,8 Within these changing health, professional, and academic contexts, this editorial seeks to become a space for reflection, which highlights the training needs and acquisition of skills for nursing students, converted into health professionals, to care for cancer patients and their family members, not only during acute moments of the disease but throughout the different stages of cancer and with a comprehensive approach centered on the person and family.

Graduating students face a living, changing society with projection, which is why abilities and skills should be developed that permit them to synchronize their own theoretical knowledge as support of their clinical practice. However, how are these future nursing professionals being prepared to care for cancer survivors and their families? Where are the unique view and contribution by the nursing discipline to respond to the specific needs of these individuals? In Europe, the academic world, framed within the European Higher Education Area, faces the change of paradigm from a traditional approach of teacher-centered teaching to student-centered teaching. According to Miguel Díaz,9 only thus is responsibility assumed on the training and development of their academic work. Thus, graduating students, future health professionals, will develop the necessary skills to “learn to learn” and, thereby, have the capacity to develop the skills they need for their dynamic work and guarantee continued education.

Given the complexity of oncology care, not only physical care, but psychosocial care inherent to the experience of living with cancer, it is vitally important to enhance nursing education in oncology. Enhancement based on introducing into the Nursing curriculum a set of innovative methodological strategies coherent with the results of learning sought, so that future nursing professionals obtain the knowledge and necessary skills to respond to the needs faced by people living with cancer. Namely, physical needs, such as management of pain, fatigue, or nausea and psychosocial needs, like management of fear and uncertainty, anxiety and depression, work and economic impact, interpersonal relationships and family communication and functioning, among others.10 For significant learning by students that provide them the necessary tools to address the cited health needs, a variety of educational methodologies must be used, such as case studies, problem-based learning, project-based learning, cooperative learning, or the expository method or magisterial lesson. Also needed are more innovative evaluation methodologies, like the approach and resolution of clinical cases, simulation, or structured objective clinical evaluation. Likewise, participation is necessary from graduating students in the clinical practice in day centers, hospitals, and primary health care for long-term follow-up of cancer survivors.

Lastly, identification of educational methodologies for significant student learning is closely related with nursing research on education. In this sense, we indicate the importance of educational decisions being based on the best evidence available to guarantee that future alumni have acquired the skills to care for patients and families living with cancer. The strength of nursing research lies in considering it an important tool to improve the clinical practice, but also as an asset to construct new frameworks of educational knowledge in benefit of student training to meet the health needs of society.

We have new challenges and many opportunities in nursing research and education!

References

1. Siegel RL, Miller KD, Jemal A. Cancer Statistics, 2017. CA Cancer J. Clin. 2017; 67(1):7-30.

RL Siegel KD Miller A Jemal Cancer Statistics, 2017CA Cancer J. Clin2017671730

2. Granek L, Mizrakli Y, Ariad S, Jotkowitz A, Geffen DB. Impact of a 3-Day Introductory Oncology Course on First-Year International Medical Students. J. Cancer Educ. 2017; 32(3):640-6.

L Granek Y Mizrakli S Ariad A Jotkowitz DB Geffen Impact of a 3-Day Introductory Oncology Course on First-Year International Medical StudentsJ. Cancer Educ2017323640646

3. Nekhlyudov L, Ganz PA, Arora NK, Rowland JH. Going Beyond Being Lost in Transition: A Decade of Progress in Cancer Survivorship. J. Clin. Oncol. 2017; 35(18):1978-81.

L Nekhlyudov PA Ganz NK Arora JH Rowland Going Beyond Being Lost in Transition: A Decade of Progress in Cancer SurvivorshipJ. Clin. Oncol2017351819781981

4. Bridges J, Wengström Y, Bailey DE. Educational Preparation of Nurses Caring for Older People with Cancer: An International Perspective. Semin. Oncol .Nurs. 2016; 32(1):16-23.

J Bridges Y Wengström DE Bailey Educational Preparation of Nurses Caring for Older People with Cancer: An International PerspectiveSemin. Oncol .Nurs20163211623

5. Sánchez-Martín CI. Cronicidad y complejidad: Nuevos roles en Enfermería. Enfermeras de Práctica Avanzada y paciente crónico. Enferm. Clin. 2014; 24(1):79-89.

CI Sánchez-Martín Cronicidad y complejidad: Nuevos roles en Enfermería. Enfermeras de Práctica Avanzada y paciente crónicoEnferm. Clin20142417989

6. García-Vivar C. Family-centered care: a necessary commitment to address chronicity. Metas Enferm. 2019; 22(2):3.

C García-Vivar Family-centered care: a necessary commitment to address chronicityMetas Enferm201922233

7. Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica (SEOM). Informe SEOM: Formación de grado en Oncología: situación, retos y recomendaciones de futuro. Madrid: SEOM; 2018. Available from: https://seom.org/seomcms/images/stories/recursos/Informe_Formacion_de_pregrado_en_Oncologia.pdf

Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica (SEOM). Informe SEOM: Formación de grado en Oncología: situación, retos y recomendaciones de futuro.MadridSEOM2018https://seom.org/seomcms/images/stories/recursos/Informe_Formacion_de_pregrado_en_Oncologia.pdf

8. European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS). Cancer Nursing Education Framework Contents [Internet].London: EONS; 2018. Available from: https://www.cancernurse.eu/documents/EONSCancerNursingFramework2018.pdf

European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS). Cancer Nursing Education Framework ContentsLondonEONS2018https://www.cancernurse.eu/documents/EONSCancerNursingFramework2018.pdf

9. Díaz MDM. Metodologías para optimizar el Aprendizaje. Segundo objetivo del Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior. Rev. Interuniversitaria de Formación Profesoral. 2006; 20(3):71-91.

MDM Díaz Metodologías para optimizar el Aprendizaje. Segundo objetivo del Espacio Europeo de Educación SuperiorRev. Interuniversitaria de Formación Profesoral20062037191

10. Watson E, Shinkins B, Frith E, Neal D, Hamdy F, Walter F, et al. Symptoms, unmet needs, psychological well-being and health status in survivors of prostate cancer: implications for redesigning follow-up. BJU Int. 2016; 117(6B):E10-9.

E Watson B Shinkins E Frith D Neal F Hamdy F Walter Symptoms, unmet needs, psychological well-being and health status in survivors of prostate cancer: implications for redesigning follow-upBJU Int20161176BE10E19

[1] García-Vivar C, La Rosa-Salas V, Domingo-Oslé M. Are Nursing Students Trained to Meet the Needs of Cancer Survivors and Their Families? New Challenges, New Opportunities. Invest. Educ. Enferm. 2019; 37(2):e01.



Los tratamientos actuales para el cáncer, junto con medidas preventivas más eficaces, están produciendo un aumento de la supervivencia del cáncer a nivel global,1 convirtiéndose en muchos casos en una enfermedad crónica.2 La atención a los pacientes y familias que conviven con una enfermedad crónica, como es el cáncer, constituye uno de los principales retos para la mayoría de los sistemas de salud porque representan una pesada carga en términos de morbilidad y mortalidad, además, conllevan un elevado porcentaje del gasto público en salud.3 Pero, sobre todo, el impacto del cáncer apareja sufrimiento como también representa una importante limitación en la calidad de vida, productividad y estado funcional de la persona enferma así como de aquellos que conviven con ella, principalmente, su familia, más aún cuando se evidencia un progresivo aumento del número de personas mayores con cáncer, que son más propensas a tener comorbilidades y otros problemas asociados con su edad, como la demencia, depresión, accidente cerebrovascular y diabetes.4 Por lo tanto, la necesidad de cuidado y apoyo hacia estas familias es clara y apremiante.

Este nuevo contexto sanitario está influyendo en el ámbito donde se desarrollan los cuidados de salud. De ahí la necesidad de que la enfermería y sus profesionales desarrollen nuevas formas de trabajar que incluyan roles y perfiles innovadores, una mayor apertura de enfoques de cuidados,5 así como la oportunidad de demostrar mayor liderazgo en los servicios de salud. Así, contribuirán a dar respuesta a los actuales desafíos sanitarios, entre ellos, el reto de la cronicidad y la atención centrada en la familia.6 Paralelamente, el nuevo contexto profesional está determinando la formación de los futuros profesionales de la salud, también en el ámbito de la atención al cáncer, tal y como apuntan diferentes sociedades científicas nacionales y europeas en oncología.7,8

En este contexto sanitario, profesional y académico cambiantes, este editorial pretende ser un espacio de reflexión en el que se resalten las necesidades formativas y la adquisición de competencias para que el estudiante de enfermería, convertido en profesional de la salud, pueda cuidar al paciente con cáncer y a sus seres queridos, no sólo en los momentos agudos de la enfermedad sino a lo largo de las diferentes etapas, y con un enfoque integral y centrado en la persona y familia. Los estudiantes de grado se enfrentan a una sociedad viva, cambiante y con proyección, por lo que deberán desarrollar habilidades y competencias que les permitan sincronizar el conocimiento teórico propio como sustento de su práctica clínica. Sin embargo, ¿cómo se está preparando a estos futuros profesionales de enfermería para poder cuidar a los supervivientes de cáncer y a sus familias?, ¿dónde está la mirada y aportación únicas de la disciplina de enfermería para dar respuesta a las necesidades específicas que presentan estas personas?

En Europa, el mundo académico, enmarcado dentro del Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior, se enfrenta al cambio de paradigma de un enfoque tradicional de enseñanza centrada en el profesor a una enseñanza centrada en el estudiante. Según de Miguel Díaz,9 sólo así se asume la responsabilidad en la formación y en el desarrollo de su trabajo académico. De esta manera los estudiantes de grado, futuros profesionales de la salud, desarrollarán las competencias necesarias para “aprender a aprender” y así tener la capacidad de desarrollar las competencias que necesiten para su trabajo dinámico y garantizar una educación continuada. Dada la complejidad de los cuidados en oncología, no sólo los cuidados físicos sino los psicosociales inherentes a la experiencia de vivir con cáncer, es de vital importancia el fortalecimiento de la educación en enfermería en oncología, basado en la introducción en el currículo de enfermería de un conjunto de estrategias metodológicas innovadoras que sean coherentes con los resultados de aprendizaje que se desean lograr, de tal manera que los futuros profesionales de enfermería posean los conocimientos y habilidades necesarias para responder a las necesidades a las que se enfrentan las personas que conviven con cáncer. A saber, necesidades físicas tales como el manejo del dolor, la fatiga o nauseas, y necesidades psicosociales como el manejo del miedo e incertidumbre, la ansiedad y depresión, el impacto laboral y económico, las relaciones interpersonales y el funcionamiento y comunicación familiar, entre otros.10

Para un aprendizaje significativo del estudiante que le dé las herramientas necesarias para el abordaje de las citadas necesidades de salud, se requiere de la utilización de una variedad de metodologías educativas, entre ellas el estudio de casos, el aprendizaje basado en problemas, el aprendizaje orientado a proyectos, el aprendizaje cooperativo o el método expositivo o lección magistral. También se requiere de metodologías más innovadoras de evaluación, como el planteamiento y resolución de casos clínicos, la simulación o la Evaluación Clínica Objetiva Estructurada. Asimismo, es necesaria la participación de los estudiantes de grado en la práctica clínica en centros de día, hospitales, y atención primaria de salud para el seguimiento de los supervivientes de cáncer.

Por último, la identificación de metodologías educativas para un aprendizaje significativo del estudiante está en estrecha relación con la investigación de enfermería en educación. En este sentido, señalamos la importancia de que las decisiones educativas estén basadas en la mejor evidencia disponible para garantizar que los futuros egresados han adquirido la competencia para el cuidado del paciente con cáncer y su familia. La fuerza de la investigación en enfermería está en considerarla como una importante herramienta para la mejora de la práctica clínica, pero también como un activo para la construcción de nuevos marcos de conocimiento educativos en beneficio de la capacitación de los estudiantes para dar respuestas a las necesidades de salud de la sociedad.

¡Tenemos nuevos retos y muchas oportunidades en investigación y educación en enfermería!

[1]García-Vivar C, La Rosa-Salas V, Domingo-Oslé M. Are Nursing Students Trained to Meet the Needs of Cancer Survivors and Their Families? New Challenges, New Opportunities. Invest. Educ. Enferm. 2019; 37(2):e01.

Abstract : 334

Article Metrics

Metrics Loading ...

Metrics powered by PLOS ALM


Esta publicación hace parte del Sistema de Revistas de la Universidad de Antioquia
¿Quieres aprender a usar el Open Journal system? Ingresa al Curso virtual
Este sistema es administrado por el Programa Integración de Tecnologías a la Docencia
Universidad de Antioquia
Powered by Public Knowledge Project